The Cravat

Manolo says, the topic of the ties, it is indeed the one of difficulty. On the one of the hands, the tie, it is one of the few of the areas in which the well-dressed man he can express his sense of the color and the drama. Yet on the other of the hands, the temptation to go over the board and wear the garish and outlandish cravats, it is great.

First, the Manolo he will tell you, as the always, that you must buy the ties of the highest quality you can afford. Cheap ties look cheap.

The most expensive of the ties, those of the French houses of the Charvet and the Hermes (which the Manolo he adores), they are in the range of the $150 to the $300, depending upon the material.

Happily, the excellent quality silk ties, they are readily available, at prices that are not beyond the means of the working man. For under $100 of the American dollars you can have the tie that will be the envy of your friends and coworkers. Ten of these, they will give you the first rate wardrobe of the neckwear. And if these ties, they are properly cared for, they will last you for the lifetime.

With the ties, as with so many of the things, the Italians, they make some of the best. They use the highest quality of the silk, and their workmanship, it is superb.

This same can be said of only one of the American manufacturers, Robert Talbott, although the ties of the Talbott, especially the super fantastic seven-fold ties. There are also the few custom makers the Manolo he approves of, such as the Seigo Katsuragawa in Manhattan, who has the ties made in the Japan on the looms of the kimono.

Manolo says, the process of the picking of the correct tie, it is more than the somewhat complex. Becuase the tie, it expresses the personality and projects the image of the wearer.

It is also complex because the decision it is based on so many of the factors. First the man, he must take into account the complexion of his skin, and then he must consider the colors of the shirt and the suit he is to wear with the tie. (For the American men, unlike those of the Europe, this is somewhat simpler, as they only typically wear the shirts of the white and the blue.)

The man shopping for the tie, he must keep these things in mind. (Of the course, most of the ties, they are bought for the man by the woman…but that’s the other story. Here at the Manolo for the Men, we will assume that the man, he does the shopping for himself.) The process it should not be stressful, but it does take the care.

Having said these things, the Manolo he will now show you five ties that he himself thinks are worth the wearing.

Manolo says, there is no blue silk like the blue silk of the Hermes, it is unmatched. This tie, it has a subtle iridescence that the Manolo he thinks would make it superb with the dark grey or dark blue suit.

Kenzo Ties
This tie by the Kenzo, the colors they are traditional, yet the tie, it embodies some of the spiritedness of the Kenzo.


Ermenegildo Zegna Ties

This tie, by the Ermenegildo Zegna, it has the interesting combination of the colors and pattern, yet it remains subtle. With the best of the Zegna ties the patterns they draw you in, rather than leap out at you.

Corneliani Ties
This tie by the Corneliani, it is an understated variation of the striped rep tie, in the tones of the earthy olive with the accents of the sky blue.

Burberry Ties
Although the Manolo he himself prefers the more subtle ties, there are times when the man, he needs the tie that speaks with the authority and the tradition. This tie from the Burberry it is just that tie. Perfect for the young American man who is climbing the ladder of the success to wear for the employment interview.

Manolo says, unless the man he is Thurston Howell III he should avoid the ascot. It is ridiculous. Likewise, unless the man he is a professor, or wishes to project the whimisical image, he should avoid the bowties. Their day as proper business wear, it has passed.

2 Responses to “The Cravat”

  1. Executus Maximus August 5, 2008 at 10:31 pm #

    The ascot is quite suitable still today. If worn with a morning suit or frock coat, which all my employees wear.

  2. Executus Maximus September 5, 2008 at 4:56 am #

    Unfortunately, none of those items pictured are cravats. Secondly, cravats should only be worn with swept wing collar, como shirts. Which are very hard to find outside of the UK. They should never be worn with pointed wing collar shirts. It’s hideous, and only reserved for butlers with bowties under the wings, or ties.

    Ascots should only be worn with wing collar shirts. DETACHABLE wing collars. Which can be purchased online from Ede & Ravenscroft or Luke Eyres. The latter has less selection though.