Armband Aid

Albert Thurston spring armband

Today, for the first time, Izzy is wearing a pair of old-fashioned armbands.  Made by esteemed braces-maker Albert Thurston of nickel-plated spring steel, they’re worn around the upper arm to shorten a shirt’s sleeves.  (In the popular imagination, they’re worn by old-time accountants and poker players in green eyeshades.)  Unless one is getting a custom-made shirt, one’s sleeves are almost never the perfect length (despite what the size says), so these can come in quite handy.  And Izzy would like to think that they’re so retro and rare that they’re cool.

 

 

10 Responses to “Armband Aid”

  1. Penelope's Web May 24, 2007 at 4:34 pm #

    Somewhere, safely tucked away, I have a set in silver. And gold. And, best of all, pearl! This is a necessity when one’s arms are very long, and the choice in manufactured shirtsleeves is either Too Short or Too Long.

    Unless one skirts the issue by wearing sleeveless (also, as it happens, with skirts). I realize this is generally not an option for the gentlemen, and I congratulate the Izzy on his rare and retro wristlets.

  2. Rich Lafferty May 24, 2007 at 5:15 pm #

    As much as I appreciate armbands for their own sake — and I’m aware of one man who wears ribbon armbands over his jacket sleeves — I’d have to update “unless one is getting a custom-made shirt” to “unless one has a good alterations tailor”. And who doesn’t have a good alterations tailor?

  3. Trey May 24, 2007 at 8:41 pm #

    I have to say, I am so glad that someone is finally featuring this item. Many times I have read in “style advice” columns in many popular men’s rags about how ‘armbands are just a sign that you’re wearing a cheap shirt’. (paraphrase). We’ve carried this item in our shop for years, and whenever I take off my jacket, it always begins a conversation. It’s almost enough to make you not want custom shirts…. almost…

  4. Greg May 24, 2007 at 10:59 pm #

    I’ve always been afraid of these, thinking that they’ll cut off the blood circulation to my hands, and leave a mark on my arm. Are my fears groundless? Are they comfortable?

  5. Manolo the Shoeblogger May 25, 2007 at 11:34 am #

    and I’m aware of one man who wears ribbon armbands over his jacket sleeves

    Something the Manolo now thinks of as the “Thom Browne Look”.

  6. Trey May 25, 2007 at 8:59 pm #

    Greg – you might be able to tell where the bands were, but not for long (kind of like pillow wrinkles on your face in the morning), but have no fear about your circulatory health. Unless you’re a body builder with massive guns, you’ll be fine.

  7. Craig June 21, 2007 at 9:20 am #

    I’ve just received my pair of these in the mail, and couldn’t be happier with them. Thanks for the pointer! I’d be hesitant to wear them without a jacket–and my wife doesn’t care for them much–but even she has to admit that they make a world of difference for the slightly-too-long dress shirt. I mean, budget is a factor for us all, at some point. I have my most formal white shirts custom-made, but economy forces me to go off-the-rack for everyday wear. These bands are just the thing. Thanks again!

  8. Lazarwolf June 21, 2007 at 11:33 am #

    I have never considered this before.
    I am thinking of trying this out.
    Where can one purchase these inexpensively?

Trackbacks/Pingbacks:

  1. Manolo for the Men - July 25, 2007

    […] Having lavishly praised the utlity of spring-steel armbands, Izzy would like to notify his loyal readers of a downside he just discovered.  In a world of ubitiquitous metal detectors, those bands can be troublesome.  Izzy hoped he could step through a security portal without triggering the alarm, but he was sorely mistaken.  Not only did he have to suffer the indignity of removing his jacket, but the guard eyed the bands suspiciously at best, mockingly at worst: ”What are those for, to make your arms looks bigger? Heh heh.”  Izzy took off the bands, politely showed them to the guard, and then used them to strangle the insolent martinet. […]