Archive - October, 2010

Nano puff hoody

Into Manhattan’s pre-dawn darkness – heavy weather accelerating across the Hudson –Mr. Henry remains steadfast in purpose. Each morning unflinchingly he leads his noble hound Pepper into Riverside park for her hour-long, off-leash walk. Storms do not deter him. Neither rain, nor snow, nor sleet, nor gloom of night will stay him from the swift completion of his appointed rounds.

On a westward descent to the water’s edge, cold wind piercing his vitals, what does Mr. Henry wear to protect himself against a savage onslaught from wildest New Jersey?

In past years he layered up with wool or fleece under a windbreaker. With today’s choices of fabrics, layering still remains the best strategy, but wool and fleece can be bulky and bunchy. Mr. Henry wants maximum protection without dressing like the Michelin Man.

Patagonia’s eminently practical “nano puff” is genuinely innovative. It is both warmer and lighter than last year’s puff. The “hoody” model, ideal for any technical expedition, keeps head and neck warm without the necessity of a scarf.

Ronald Reagan

Congratulations to Jeff the Baptist who, well, correctly guessed the identity of Monday’s Man of Mystery.

Curiously enough, if you Google Vice-President Joe Biden, the same image of Reagan as a young lifeguard pops up. Mistakes like these undermine one’s faith in the reliability of internet information.

Do you know this man?

Mr. Henry asks, “How good if your eye for famous men?”

Toshiro Mifune

Congratulations to Balu who correctly guessed the identity of Monday’s Man of Mystery, the incomparable Toshiro Mifune.

Do you know this man?

Mr. Henry asks, “How good is your eye for famous men?”

Jon Hamm

Congratulations to Daniel for correctly guessing the identity of Monday’s Man of Mystery, the suavely sinister Donald Draper.

Quest for Perfect Jeans

Finding a decent pair of denims can become a quest for the holy grail, a foredoomed pursuit of glories past.

On their website you can buy Levi’s 501 button-fly “rigid rinse,” the ur-jeans, for a mere $36 – forgiving to the wallet but not to the body. They are guaranteed to chafe your inner thighs.

Or you may elect to buy the same cut 501’s (“XX” made in Amsterdam) from a slightly higher quality dark-wash denim for $268 at J. Crew. They are a little more comfortable than the originals, but at that price you don’t want to wear them when weeding a thorny garden.

Choices in between are limited to streaky, over-washed, greasy-feeling, thin-weight, distressed jeans that look as if a homeless person had traded them for a cup of coffee.

First off, stop looking for the cup of everlasting life. Jeans don’t have to be perfect (which is a relief to know because you will probably fail to find perfect ones anyway). Jeans need not be the repository of your essential being or the sacred vessel of your singularity. Grand hopes and dreams will overstuff a pair of humble denims. Anyway, aren’t denims the most conformist of clothing choices?

Blue jeans were born in the 19th-century as cheap work pants. Above all they are supposed to be sturdy. After a requisite breaking-in period, they may become comfortable, too. However, in the good old days comfort was second to their ability to withstand a season of gold-panning without ripping.

Do you know this man?

Mr. Henry asks, “How good is your eye for famous men?”

George Clooney

Congratulations to Jeff the Baptist who correctly guessed the identity of Monday’s Man of Mystery. Clearly there is hope for every geeky sixth grader.

Eexamsheets – http://www.examsheets.com/exam/642-902.htm
Realtests – http://www.realtests.com/exam/350-030.htm
Test-inside – http://www.test-inside.com/200-101.htm
Passguide – http://www.passguide.com/350-001.html
Selftestengine – http://www.selftestengine.com/640-816.html

Do you know this man?

Mr. Henry asks, “How good is your eye for famous men?”