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The Manstalker Hat

the hat squad

Having read about the sartorial choices of New York detectives not too long ago, Izzy was pleased to read an article about the Atlanta homicide squad’s fondness for fedoras:

The first fedoras are usually black, sometimes brown, almost always made of fine, soft fur felt. They wear Stetson and Dobbs, names that have been around for decades as institutions of haberdashery.

Atlanta police homicide detectives like their traditions the way they like their hats. Classy.  Meaningful.

Every one of the 16 homicide detectives has at least one fedora. It’s a solemn, stylish reward the first time he or she solves a case, paid for and delivered by the more experienced officers.

“It makes you feel like you’re part of something,” says Detective Mark Cooper, part of the unit since 2002. “Once you get it in your blood, you don’t want to do anything else.”

[…]

The fedora was a part of a detective’s garb through the late 1950s, when the pinched-and-creased hat was in style. Many credit retired Atlanta police Lt. Danny Agan for bringing it back when he joined the unit in 1979, and his partner, Sgt. Charles Horton, for keeping it going. Fedoras were long out of fashion — they’re tough to wear with big hair and big collars — but Agan says it made him feel completely dressed. He bought his son, homicide Detective Danny Agan Jr., his first fedora, too.

“You dress the part, you dress like a detective, you get better results,” says the senior Agan, 55, of Douglasville, who retired five years ago. “It commands respect: Who’s showing up to take charge of this mess?”

Even when Agan left the unit for a few years, snappy dressers continued the style.

In the early 1990s, it became less fashion statement, more symbol. Solve a case, earn a hat.

It was only in the early 2000s, though, that detectives started chipping in to buy the first hat. Now, it’s often presented at dinner or a meeting, Lt. Keith Meadows says, to catch its wearer off-guard.

Detectives say the head gear is popular enough now that people living around a crime scene know a homicide is suspected when a man in a fedora steps out of a car.

“When you see a fedora on TV, you know what the story is going to be about,” says Rick Linkwald, owner of the Executive Shop, a downtown clothing and hat store.

You can tell the police officers by their walk, he says. When they shop at this store, they gravitate to black fur felt Stetsons with wide brims and brown-and-red feathers, priced at $159. First-time hat buyers usually stare in the mirror and admit how much they look like their fathers and grandfathers; it’s not so different for detectives following a tradition instead of a trend.

“They want to dress like guys they admire,” Linkwald says.

All of this is well and good, assuming the brims are not too large, but Izzy was dismayed to see (in the photo above) how the detectives maltreat their fedoras.  As any haberdasher will tell you, a fine hat is to be placed on its crown when not being worn so as not to warp the brim.

The No-Band Camp

Dean Martin in camp collar

There is perhaps no more casually elegant shirt collar than the camp collar.  Constructed without a collar band (the strip of fabric that fastens around the neck), the soft collar is part of the same piece of fabric as the body of the shirt, giving it a truly seamless look.  Generally worn unbuttoned, they have a tendency to spread wide.  As Dean Martin proved, they can help separate a gentleman from the pack.

Hairy Like a Guerrilla

Steven Soderbergh with neck beard

While visting Cannes for the screening of Che, his bio-pic of Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara, director Steven Soderbergh sported a beard that extended down beneath his shirt collar.  Given that Soderbergh is usually clean-shaven, can there be any doubt that he disposed of his razor (and good sense) in homage to Che’s neck beard, which made him look like he had a lion’s mane?

Che with lion’s mane

Portable Teepee

Banana Republic pants tent suit

In one of Izzy’s favorite episodes of Curb Your Enthusiasm, the neurotic protagonist is highly annoyed by extra trouser fabric bunching up over his crotch. But the “pants tent,” as Larry David calls it, is a phenomenon that occurs only when he sits down, which makes the ill-fitting crotch on these Banana Republic trousers even more inexcusable.

Wearing Headgear with Relish

hot dog hat

Wisconsin cheeseheads be damned, there is nothing more American than wearing a hot dog cap at a baseball game.   That is, until someone invents an apple pie hat.

Pants on Fire

strapping young firefighters

If women love a man in uniform, they must surely lurv a man in half of one, at least when he has the hard-earned, eminently practical figure of a firefighter.

Obama of Arabia?

Obama in Somali garb

The Barack Obama campaign is blaming Hillary Clinton’s camp for leaking this photo of him to the public in order to reinforce paranoid, stupid fears that he is a crypto-Muslim.  The picture was taken in August 2006 when Obama was visiting Wajir, a desert, largely Muslim area in northeast Kenya.  The garb was presented to him by local elders, and the politician diplomatically tried it on.  Although Izzy has written about the risks and rewards of going native sartorially (something the Manolo also noted about President Bush), surely Obama did the right thing in donning the sash and turban in the presence of his hosts.  (And it should go without saying, but that headgear is worn not only by Muslims.)  The real shame is that many politicians, wishing to avoid the possibility of such pictures being used to falsely smear them, will end up being rude when faced with similar opportunities abroad.  And it’s not exactly if Americans overseas are known for their worldliness

The Man in the White Hat

Spike Lee in white hat

With his thick, nearly-octagonal eyeglasses, Obama-for-President button, and bowtie-less tuxedo shirt, Spike Lee had a lot going on at the Oscar’s, but thanks to that dashing white trilby, he proved himself one of the good guys.

Turning Siamese

Thom Browne siamese pants

Courtesy of Thom Browne comes this freakish nightmare—of ironing, that is.

Manwich

manwich

“While suitable for Princess Leia, the world’s largest earmuffs are best avoided in this galaxy. Despite being absolutely hideous, those earmuffs are probably absurdly expensive, so much so that most people would have to consider taking a cheap cash advance in order to afford them.”

Eexamsheets – http://www.examsheets.com/exam/VCP-510.htm
Realtests – http://www.realtests.com/exam/70-410.htm
Test-inside – http://www.test-inside.com/000-780.htm
Passguide – http://www.passguide.com/70-680.html
Selftestengine – http://www.selftestengine.com/640-802.html

Old English Sheepdog

Old English sheepdog wig

When you’re having a bad face day, there’s nothing better than a shaggy wig topped off with a tartan beret.  At least you can’t see yourself in the mirror.

Pink Eye for the Conservative Guy

pinks and reds

Capturing a sentiment that originated with the French Revolution, Republicans in France for a long time subscribed to the slogan, “Il n’y a pas d’ennemi à gauche,” meaning “No enemies to the left.”  Whether or not that should be the case in politics, it is certainly true with respect to the colors on the political spectrum: Pinks and Reds can indeed get along.

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